Just another WordPress.com site

  • Featured Image -- 248
  • Featured Image -- 246
  • Featured Image -- 242
  • Featured Image -- 198
  • Featured Image -- 181

Latest

FAQ: What Camera Should I Buy?

Moniemuse

Thinking about buying a camera is like wondering who your one true soul mate is. You can dream of all the adventures you two will have one day, and image the memories you’ll capture together but just like romance, the fantasy can blind you into making the wrong choice.

Trying to figure out the right camera to buy can be challenging. The endless research can be overwhelming. So I offer you my love story with my cameras.

The first question I’d ask you is why do you want a camera? Once you share your passion and excitement then’ll I’ll crush it by asking how much money do you have to buy it?

The point is to get the soul purpose of your desire. You might be selling yourself short if you answer about your budget first. I saved up for my DSLR for 6 months and paid for it cash. I had learn…

View original post 1,096 more words

Rethinking Stealing with Jamaal May

the minnesota review

Jamaal May Jamaal May

I spent a good chunk of February 5th with Jamaal May. In hindsight, I should have chugged a gallon of espresso in order to keep up with this fast-talking, passionate, Detroit-based poet. Over lunch with a few Virginia Tech MFA students, May gave away morsels from the craft talk he would be delivering soon afterwards, titled “Steal This Class.” Having experienced teaching poetry in Detroit public schools, May deplores how something as idealistic as the U.S. education system has been boiled down to the place where we are merely programmed.

He elaborated on this during the craft talk at Shanks Hall, where he demonstrated how intelligence is nowadays assessed by how well we are programmed.

“What’s 1 plus 1?” May asked the audience. The chorused reply: “Two.”

“Let’s complicate the question,” May proposed. “One of what?” He went on to explain how this outside-the-box thinking in…

View original post 404 more words

The Unbearable Solitude of Being an African Fan Girl

omenana

By Chinelo Onwualu

Being an African fan girl is a strange, liminal thing. You’re never quite sure that you exist, you see. A part of you is rooted in your culture and its expectations for how a woman ought to behave – church, family, school – but another is flying off into the stars carrying a samurai sword and a machete. Not one thing or another, you’re both at the same time.

It doesn’t help that you’re invisible. In all the representations of geek culture, in all the arguments for inclusion, it doesn’t seem like your voice can be heard. After all, shows like The Big Bang Theory which are supposed to be modern representations of geeks and their culture seem entirely populated by white people with plenty of free time and disposable income. If you don’t look like that, don’t have that kind of money or time, are you…

View original post 1,048 more words

The Eroticism of Placelessness

Cody Delistraty

On the way loneliness, freedom, and romance are intertwined.

For the past few weeks, I’ve woken up unsure exactly where I am. My bed, a modest full size, looks out onto a cobblestone courtyard framed by green linden trees and an intricately decorated castle. I’m in a pocket-sized one-bedroom apartment and although it is behind the Place des Vosges in Paris, by the looks of it I could be in Normandy or Toulouse, even Vermont. For that matter, there is no real way for me to know the year is 2014: save for the circle-pronged electrical outlet tucked behind my dresser, I could be waking up in the eighteenth century. In the haze of the early morning, these things tend to meld together.

The feeling of placelessness is a bit like a dream: the heightened romance, the intense brooding, the inherently transitory nature of the whole affair. Placelessness happens…

View original post 886 more words

BREAKING: Ghana Plans To Export Electricity To Nigeria

Enepee's Blog

Ghana plans to export
electricity to Nigeria
Ghana says it is planning to
export thousands of
megawatts of electricity to
Nigeria, Ivory Coast and
other neighbouring
countries that have power
deficit.
The Ghanaian President, Mr.
John Mahama, who made
the disclosure at the Africa
Global Business and
Economic Forum in Dubai
on Wednesday, said his
government had made
huge investments in power
generation that would
enable the country to
export excess electricity to
Nigeria and others.
“We have given priority to
electricity generation in our
country. We have prioritised
energy in such a way that
we want to become the
hub for power production
in West Africa. We want to
generate electricity to the
point that excess power
can be exported to Nigeria,
Ivory Coast and other
countries that have power
deficit,” he said.
To achieve this dream,
Mahama said his country
had secured export-import
financing from China as well

View original post 247 more words

The Moral Cost of Travel

♥️

Cody Delistraty

It was in Paradise Lost that John Milton introduced the notion that Adam and Eve ate an apple from the Tree of Knowledge (thus explaining why your “knowledgeable” elementary school teachers may have had the infamous symbol sitting on their desks).The writers of Genesis left the forbidden fruit unspecified, but scholars have since claimed it could have been a grape, possibly a fig, even a pomegranate. Whatever it was exactly, the first Biblical book is clear that its consumption is the ultimate sin — and ever since the Western world has equated knowledge with a loss of innocence. Banned from Eden, the original sinners were also the original knowledge seekers, and the idea that understanding means corruption is widespread — oft-seen in dubiously well-known phrases like “Ignorance is bliss.”

Throughout history, innocence has been lost when new knowledge is gained, and the most common way for that to happen is by…

View original post 1,369 more words

The Moral Cost of Travel

♥️

Cody Delistraty

It was in Paradise Lost that John Milton introduced the notion that Adam and Eve ate an apple from the Tree of Knowledge (thus explaining why your “knowledgeable” elementary school teachers may have had the infamous symbol sitting on their desks).The writers of Genesis left the forbidden fruit unspecified, but scholars have since claimed it could have been a grape, possibly a fig, even a pomegranate. Whatever it was exactly, the first Biblical book is clear that its consumption is the ultimate sin — and ever since the Western world has equated knowledge with a loss of innocence. Banned from Eden, the original sinners were also the original knowledge seekers, and the idea that understanding means corruption is widespread — oft-seen in dubiously well-known phrases like “Ignorance is bliss.”

Throughout history, innocence has been lost when new knowledge is gained, and the most common way for that to happen is by…

View original post 1,369 more words

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.